Dear DHPE Members, Partners and Supporters,


It is will great sadness to announce that the Directors of Health Promotion and Education (DHPE) have finally closed our doors after being in operation for 72 years. The Association of State and Territorial Directors of Health Promotion and Public Health Education (ASTDHPPHE) dba the Directors of Health Promotion and Education (DHPE) is dissolving. As with many non-profits in recent years, DHPE has been challenged to do more with less.  

On behalf of the Board of Directors of DHPE, I want to thank all of you who have contributed to the success of DHPE over its 72-year history.  We have accomplished so much toward our shared mission of strengthening public health capacity in policy and in systems change to improve the health of all and achieve health equity. 

Although DHPE is dissolving, the programs that we collectively have worked hard to establish and maintain will be continuing under new leadership. The assets of these programs have been given to the excellent caretakers, which are highlighted below.

Again, thank you for all your hard work and support of all our programs, and we hope you will utilize some of these resources as your agency pursues future policy, systems and environmental change approaches to improve the health of our communities and the Nation!

The Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), a nonprofit organization with our shared goals and vision, will maintain the balance of DHPE programs, that are NOT designated below, on their website. We want all of our former members and partners to reach out to SOPHE as an organizational home and/or resource for future professional development. They will be offering special membership pricing for former members of DHPE. SOPHE can be reached at: https://www.sophe.org/

Should you have a need to contact DHPE, we will have email access for a few more months at: info@dhpe.org or dsammons-hackett@dhpe.org


DHPE Programs and New Homes:

Systems Change for Health

Starting January 1, 2018, Carolyn Crump, PhD and James Emery, MPH - the curriculum developers for Systems Change for Health (SCH) - will be administrating and operating the program. You may view the courses at the new website: 


You can learn more about the authors at: http://UNCHealthySolutions.web.unc.edu . Thank you for your continued support of and/or interest in the Systems Change for Health (SCH) training program!

Minority Internship and Fellowship Program

The Association of State Public Health Nutritionists (ASPHN) is operating the Health Equity Internship Program starting in January 2017. Please send your emails and inquiries to ASPHN Executive Director Karen Probert at internship@asphn.orgThank you for your interest in the Health Equity Internship Program!

Lupus Health Education Program

The purpose of the DHPE Lupus Health Education Program entitled LEAP is to reduce lupus related health disparities among racial and ethnic minority populations disproportionately affected by this disease by conducting a national lupus education initiative. The caretaker agreement is still under development.

National Implementation and Dissemination for Chronic Disease Prevention Initiative

The CDC-funded National Implementation and Dissemination for Chronic Disease Prevention Initiative, also referred to as Partnering4Health has come to an end. DHPE would like to thank each of you for your participation and support of the project over the past three years. Several resources have been created as a part of Partnering4Health and these resources are available to you and your affiliates to be utilized in the future. Learn more below:

  • The Partnering4Health white paper has been released.  The white paper includes both a summary documentas well as pull-outs for each focus area of physical activity, nutrition, smoke-free environments and community clinical linkages. 
  • The Partnering4Health microsite hosts the white paper as well as additional resources from the national project. The site is hosted by the Society of Public Health Education (SOPHE) at http://partnering4health.org
  • DHPE created an online sustainability course, featuring several community partners.  The course also has an accompanying toolkit created by SOPHE.
  • A  final video integrates interviews with national partners, including American Health Association, American Planning Association, and the National WIC Association, from the Denver meeting. 
News & Press: Additional Health Promotion & Education News

How HEAVY is your STATE?

Tuesday, August 14, 2012   (0 Comments)
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Press Release from TFA

For Immediate Release: August 13, 2012



Washington, D.C. August 13, 2012 –Twelve states currently have an adult obesity rate above 30 percent, according to a new analysis released today by the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The analysis used the state obesity rates made available today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Mississippi had the highest rate of obesity at 34.9 percent, while Colorado had the lowest rate at 20.7 percent. Twenty-six of the 30 states with the highest obesity rates are in the Midwest and South.

"Obesity has contributed to a stunning rise in chronic disease rates and health care costs. It is one of the biggest health crises the country has ever faced,” said Jeffrey Levi, PhD, TFAH executive director. "The good news is that we have a growing body of evidence and approaches that we know can help reduce obesity, improve nutrition and increase physical activity based on making healthier choices easier for Americans. The bad news is we're not investing anywhere near what we need to in order to bend the obesity curve and see the returns in terms of health and savings.”

Later this summer, TFAH and RWJF will release the 2012 edition of F as in Fat, the annual report that analyzes state obesity rates and policy efforts to address the epidemic, and provides policy recommendations. For the first time, the 2012 report will include a study that forecasts 2030 obesity rates in each state and the likely resulting rise in obesity-related disease rates and health care costs. The analysis also will examine the potential impact of a 5 percent reduction in body mass index (BMI) levels and the number of Americans who could be spared from type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke, hypertension, arthritis and obesity-related cancers if they were able to achieve that reduction. Additionally, the projection will feature the cost savings that could be achieved in each state as a result of a 5 percent BMI reduction. For a six-foot-tall person weighing 200 pounds, a 5 percent reduction in BMI would be the equivalent of losing roughly 10 pounds.

In 2006, obesity-related medical costs totaled $147 billion a year, or nearly 10 percent of total medical spending, according to a 2011 study in Health Affairs. The bulk of the spending is generated from treating obesity-related diseases, such as diabetes.


"Our nation has made important inroads to creating healthier communities,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, RWJF president and CEO. "Some cities and states that have taken comprehensive action to address the epidemic are beginning to see declines in their obesity rates. But we need to expand and intensify our efforts. Investing in prevention today will mean a healthier tomorrow for our children.”

In recognition of the dramatic health and financial consequences of obesity, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) earlier this year released a comprehensive report that outlined strategies for reversing the epidemic and called on everyone to advance those strategies. The IOM committee, made up of nutritionists, public health experts, and leaders from the public, private and nonprofit sectors, called for a focused commitment to: making physical activity an integral and routine part of life, creating food and beverage environments that ensure that healthy food and beverage options are the routine, easy choice, transforming messages about physical activity and nutrition, expanding the role of health care providers, insurers and employers in obesity prevention, and making schools a national focal point for obesity prevention.



According to the newly released CDC data, part of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, the obesity rates by state from highest to lowest were:

1. Mississippi (34.9%); 2. Louisiana (33.4%); 3. West Virginia (32.4%); 4. Alabama (32.0%); 5. Michigan (31.3%); 6. Oklahoma (31.1%); 7. Arkansas (30.9%); 8. (tie) Indiana (30.8%); and South Carolina (30.8%); 10. (tie) Kentucky (30.4%); and Texas (30.4%); 12. Missouri (30.3%); 13. (tie) Kansas (29.6%); and Ohio (29.6%); 15. (tie) Tennessee (29.2%); and Virginia (29.2%); 17. North Carolina (29.1%); 18. Iowa (29.0%); 19. Delaware (28.8%); 20. Pennsylvania (28.6%); 21. Nebraska (28.4%); 22. Maryland (28.3%); 23. South Dakota (28.1%); 24. Georgia (28.0%); 25. (tie) Maine (27.8%); and North Dakota (27.8%); 27. Wisconsin (27.7%); 28. Alaska (27.4%): 29. Illinois (27.1%);30. Idaho (27.0%); 31. Oregon (26.7%); 32. Florida (26.6%); 33. Washington (26.5%); 34. New Mexico (26.3%); 35. New Hampshire (26.2%); 36. Minnesota (25.7%); 37. (tie) Rhode Island (25.4%); and Vermont (25.4%); 39. Wyoming (25.0%); 40. Arizona (24.7%); 41. Montana (24.6%); 42. (tie) Connecticut (24.5%); Nevada (24.5%); and New York (24.5%); 45. Utah (24.4%); 46. California (23.8%); 47. (tie) District of Columbia (23.7%); and New Jersey (23.7%); 49. Massachusetts (22.7%);50. Hawaii (21.8%); 51. Colorado (20.7%).

Note: 1 = Highest rate of adult obesity, 51 = lowest rate of adult obesity. Individuals with a body mass index (a calculation based on weight and height ratios) of 30 or higher are considered obese.

CDC has modernized the methodology for BRFSS this year, setting a new baseline for comparisons. The updated approach, incorporating cell phones and using an iterative proportional fitting data weighting method, means rates are even more reflective of each states' population, but that the rates were determined in a different way than in the past, making direct change comparisons difficult. The full data set can be found at: http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/technical_infodata/surveydata/2011.htm.

The 2011 F as in Fat report is available on TFAH's website at: www.healthyamericans.org and the upcoming 2012 F as in Fat report will be released later this summer.



Suzanne Pechilio Polis

Trust for America's Health

1730 M Street, NW

Suite 900

Washington, DC 20036




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