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Senate legislation to end taxpayer subsidy for junk food ads to kids

Monday, May 19, 2014   (0 Comments)
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From the Center for Science in the Public Interest 

As many of you know, the Food Marketing Workgroup has been working on legislation to eliminate the tax deductibility of unhealthy food marketing to kids expenses. Today, U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) and Tom Harkin (D-IA) introduced the Stop Subsidizing Childhood Obesity Act, which would prohibit companies from deducting expenses for advertising and marketing unhealthy foods to children under 14. Revenue generated by eliminating these tax deductions would be directed to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program, which serves fruit and vegetable snacks to elementary school students in low-income areas. Representative Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) is the sponsor of a similar bill (H.R. 2831) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

(Washington, DC) – Today, U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and U.S. Senator Tom Harkin (D-Iowa), chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, introduced the Stop Subsidizing Childhood Obesity Act of 2014, legislation that would end the federal tax subsidy for unhealthy food and beverage marketing to children. The legislation requires that money generated by the elimination of the tax subsidy be used to fund the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program, which provides fresh fruit or vegetable snacks to elementary school students in low-income schools. Harkin created the program in 2002. According to a study published in the Journal of Law and Economics and funded by the National Institutes of Health, the elimination of the tax subsidy could reduce the rates of childhood obesity by five to seven percent.


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